Best VPNs for Chrome

Best VPNs for Chrome

We tested many, many VPN services so you don’t have to. And you know what — not all of them have a useful Chrome extension. That, however, doesn’t mean they won’t “get the job done” — a Windows or Mac OS app will do just as well and the same goes if you install/setup VPN on your router — but still, it’s nice to know that a dedicated extension is there to help.

So we had to check all VPNs to get to those that are best suited for Chrome users. Also, we took into account other factors, ’cause chances are — you will also be using VPN for other things. And so our list of best 5 VPNs for Chrome was born.

As usual, not all VPNs are made equal, despite having a dedicated Chrome extension. Therefore, we don’t have one, but 5 services on the list — all of which are pretty awesome. For the best overall experience, get the top service and forget about it…

We’ve said it enough — here are the best 5 VPNs for Chrome you can buy today:

1
NordVPN

at NordVPN.com
Our rating:
Price from: $3.49/mo
30-day money-back guarantee

Pros

Cons

  • 5,000+ servers in the network
  • Easy to use - install it and forget it
  • One license is good for up to 6 devices
  • Strict zero-logs policy
  • 30-day money-back guarantee
  • Chrome extension is just a proxy
  • You can't pay with PayPal

Summary

NordVPN not only shines on Windows and Macs, it also works well with Chrome which is extremely handy for Chromebook owners.

The company has developed the proxy extension for Chrome that encrypts your browser traffic, which for Chromebook owners means - it gets the job done. For everyone else, they'll still want to install the full app on their computer.

Also working in NordVPN's favor are its zero-logs policy and protection against WebRTC leaks, as well as advanced privacy features that put you, the user, in control — rather than major tech giants like Google and Facebook.
2
ExpressVPN

at ExpressVPN.com
Our rating:
Price from: $8.32/mo
30-day money-back guarantee

Pros

Cons

  • Feature-rich yet easy to use
  • One of the best VPNs around
  • Strong no-logging policy
  • Reliable support you can reach 24/7
  • Limited number of servers in Africa and the Middle East
  • Kinda pricey

Summary

ExpressVPN offers a full-featured Chrome extension that works alongside a desktop app to encrypt all internet traffic across your device’s applications. Once enabled - it just works. Except if you're an advanced user, you don't even have to even care about advanced features. But if you do — they are just a click away.

And that's just one piece of the puzzle; ExpressVPN also shines in other areas and we can't recommend it enough. It may not be the cheapest option out there, but it's definitely one of the best ones.
3
Hotspot Shield

at HotspotShield.com
Our rating:
Price from: $2.99/mo
45-day money-back guarantee

Pros

Cons

  • It's super fast!
  • Works with Netflix, BBC and others
  • Easy to use apps, browser extensions
  • You can try it for free!
  • Some advanced features are not configurable
  • Doesn't work in high-censorship countries

Summary

Hotspot Shield could easily be the fastest VPNs out there with its proprietary technology helping the company deliver blazing-fast download AND upload speeds. Chrome users will love its extension that works in tandem with a desktop app to deliver the goods, including the buffer-free streaming (Netflix included), fast torrenting and so on.

Your privacy is equally well protected, with the software only collecting some anonymized that to continually improve its service.

There is one caveat though - it won't work that good in high-censorship countries like China. If you don't need that in the first place, we can highly recommend Hotspot Shield to you.

As that's typically the case with most VPN services out there, the longer you commit - the better deal you get. However, what makes Hotspot Shield even better is the fact that it offers a 7-day free trial of its service. A few other top VPN providers do the same. Plus, its money-back guarantee lasts for 45 days, making for a risk-free purchase. Cause, you can always get your money back. Sweet and just the way we like it.
4
IPVanish

at IPVanish.com
Our rating:
Price from: $6.49/mo
30-day money-back guarantee

Pros

Cons

  • One the best VPNs for torrenting
  • Works well with Netflix
  • Simple setup on all popular devices
  • Strict zero-logs policy
  • Doesn't work with BBC iPlayer
  • Doesn't work in China

Summary

IPVanish has a dedicated page for Chromebooks. However, you won't get the full functionality of the "regular" desktop app like the ones for Macs and Windows PCs.

Chromebook users still get to benefit from IPVanish's strict zero-logs policy, network encryption and the ability to bypass censorship in many countries — though not China.

Those running Chrome on a Windows PC or Mac get many other features with the IPVanish app doing all the hard work in the background.
5
Surfshark

at Surfshark.com
Our rating:
Price from: $1.99/mo
30-day money-back guarantee

Pros

Cons

  • Reliable download and upload speeds
  • Works with Netflix and BBC iPlayer
  • Strict zero-logs policy
  • Lets you use it on unlimited number of devices
  • Low number of servers in Africa and Australia

Summary

Surfshark is one of the services with the best Chrome extension, and we love it for that. It may not be the best VPN all round, but it's definitely worth the money — and it's more affordable than its bigger rivals.

In addition, as part of the deal - you also get features such as CleanWeb that lets you "surf in clean cyber ocean" with no ads, trackers, malware and phishing attempts; MultiHop, which connects to multiple servers at once; and Camouflage Mode which makes sure that even your internet provider can’t tell that you’re using a VPN.

Surfshark has a zero-logs policy and the fact that it's based in the British Virgin Islands makes sure that your web whereabouts are always flying under the radar. Check it out.

Chrome 101

Google Chrome is a cross-platform web browser that was originally released in 2008 for Microsoft Windows. Later on, it was ported to Linux, macOS, iOS, and Android where it is the default browser built into the operating system. The browser is also the main component of Chrome OS, where it serves as the platform for web applications.

Most of Chrome’s source code comes from Google’s free and open-source software project Chromium, but Chrome is licensed as proprietary freeware. WebKit was the original rendering engine, but Google eventually forked it to create the Blink engine; all Chrome variants except iOS now use Blink.

As of May 2020, StatCounter and NetMarketShare estimate that Chrome has a 68% worldwide browser market share (after peaking at 72.38% in November 2018) on personal computers (PC), 63.58% and 65.01% respectively across all platforms. Because of this success, Google has expanded the “Chrome” brand name to other products: Chrome OS, Chromecast, Chromebook, Chromebit, Chromebox, and Chromebase.

User tracking concerns

Chrome sends details about users’ activities to Google through both optional and non-optional user tracking mechanisms. Unofficial builds, such as SRWare Iron, seek to remove these features from the browser altogether.

In March 2010, Google devised a new method to collect installation statistics: the unique ID token included with Chrome is now used for only the first connection that Google Update makes to its server.

The optional suggestion service included in Google Chrome has been criticized because it provides the information typed into the Omnibox to the search provider before the user even hits return. This allows the search engine to provide URL suggestions, but also provides them with web use information tied to an IP address.

The optional feature to use a web service to help resolve spelling errors has privacy implications, as well.

A 2019 review by Washington Post technology columnist Geoffrey A. Fowler found that Chrome allowed thousands of more cookies to be stored than Mozilla Firefox, and that Chrome was sending information about all of his browsing to Google. Fowler pointed out that Google is a major producer of third-party cookies and has a financial interest in collecting user data; he recommended switching to Firefox, Apple Safari, or Chromium-based Brave.

Why use a VPN with Chrome?

In some instances, you can’t easily switch browsers, but what you can do is use a VPN. This way, you will at least make it a bit harder for Google to keep up with every step you make online.

Remember that the Incognito mode alone is not enough – you are still using Google’s own browser and with your IP address unchanged, websites will be able to determine that’s still you who’s accessing their website.

With a VPN, you make it harder for everyone to track you on the Internet. Also, you get to bypass various restrictions that may be imposed by your employer, your school or some foreign government when visiting high-censorship countries.

And that’s just a start with the best VPNs offering a number of other benefits, as well. Which means, you shouldn’t get a VPN for one service/browser only, but…

Get a VPN for all your needs

You need a VPN for many things, not just for Chrome. A good VPN will:

  • Protect your privacy from the government and big corporations
  • Bypass restrictions imposed by the government or various organizations
  • Change your IP address so you get unrestricted access to Netflix, Disney+, iPlayer, HULU, and other video streaming services
  • Encrypt and protect private data from cybercriminals
  • Download files with BitTorrent anonymously

The top contenders that check all these boxes — while also working with Chrome — include the following services:

30-day money-back guarantee
30-day money-back guarantee
45-day money-back guarantee